Joachim Kempin Unveils His Big Plan To Save Microsoft

Most of you are already well acquainted with Joachim Kempin by now, the former Microsoftie who left the company back in 2002. The man has been all over the news these past few weeks promoting his new book about his time at Redmond.

Well, he is back again, this time with a plan and bundle of advices for the technology titan in order to make sure the company remains in tip top shape in the long term.

Posting on ReadWrite, Kempin first and foremost believes that Microsoft needs a new leader — not all that surprising when you consider all the choice words he has had to say about CEO Steve Ballmer, pretty much since the start of the year:

“The company needs a bold and charismatic executive with bona fide technical credentials to head all of its product divisions. This dynamic leader must not only serve as the main spokesperson for all products, but he or she must also inspire and command the respect of developers.”

With that done, he says Microsoft should focus a lot more on the enterprise market, as that is the only one that is expected to embrace all its products in the future, including the Windows operating system.

Thirdly, the company should try to make the most of the education system in the United States, as plenty of school computers are not only running outdated software, but this provides the company with a chance to market to a younger generation:

“From a marketing perspective, wouldn’t it be great to introduce the next generation early in life to a company called Microsoft instead of Google?”

Hmm, mildly interesting, if I say so myself.

He concludes by emphasizing that take another jab at Steve Ballmer (this time, indirectly, though) detailing the steps the new leader should take to differentiate the company from its competitors:

“This new tech leader should streamline Microsoft’s offerings in several key product areas. Mimicking Google, and trying to beat Google, which is what Microsoft is doing today, is a distraction and will not lead to dominance.”

Well, what do you guys think? Agree with any (or all) of Mr. Kempin’s views, and how implementable they are. Sound off in the comments section below.

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