Microsoft Admits It Still Has Work To Do To Educate Users On Windows RT

Windows RT has been one of the more interesting new products from Microsoft, partly due to the slow uptake of the platform, partly due to how hardware vendors see it, and partly due to what Redmond feels about it.

Soon after release, the Windows version for ARM processors saw some app developers taking their time to come to grips with it when it came to coding leading to only x86 and x64 versions of some apps.

However, all that is behind us now — with almost all good apps on the Windows Store offering versions for devices powered by Windows RT.

But Windows chief Julie Larson-Green, speaking during the Wired Business Conference admitted that Microsoft needs to work closer with partners to emphasize and highlight the key features of Windows RT, including its lack of support for traditional desktop software:

“I think we have some work to do on explaining it to people because it’s different.

They’re just so used to Windows meaning backward compatibility in all the programs that you use today. I use Surface RT as my main computing device, I connect to a corporate network using my virtual smart card and VPN when I need to, Office is already on there […] it’s just a simpler experience and then the Surface Pro has the flexibility if you want to work on the details.”

Latest estimates by IDC reveal that Microsoft has reportedly sold 900,000 Surface tablets, most of which have been the Pro variants that run the full version of Windows 8. Surface RT, even with its head start is still trailing behind its newer cousin, even though it was officially released in October 2012.

Redmond would be hoping to turn things around on this front with Windows RT 8.1 just around the corner, and hardware vendors planning to bring about more affordable Windows-based slates.

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