3DMark For Windows 8 Delayed Yet Again

Guess what? The newest version of 3DMark benchmark software that was being developed for Windows 8 is delayed once more. And this time the developer is giving no timeline for release, either.

3DMark for Windows 8 was initially set for a showing by the end of 2012, but then the release date was pushed to sometime in January.

Well sometime in January is here, and developer Futuremark posted a release update in a press release earlier today. The reason cited is the delay from its many partners in the Benchmark Developers Program. As the developer states:

“BPD members receive every development build and have access to source code to see how the benchmark functions. We believe that this open process of close cooperation with industry experts is the only way way (sic) to create accurate and impartial benchmarks that measure performance fairly.”

Several companies including Microsoft, Intel, AMD and NVIDIA are part of the program. And as stated in the press release, it takes time to gather and resolve feedback from so many partners.

While Futuremark provided a blanket reason for the delay, it stopped short of giving a new date, saying that the new version 3DMark will be ready when it’s ready, which they expect to be sooner rather than later.

Ready when it’s ready, you say?

Still, the new benchmark suite for Windows 8 is very highly anticipated, and developer states that this going to be their best benchmark yet (surprise!) and well worth waiting for.

One reason why it is worth waiting for is that it will come with two benchmark demos — Fire Strike for DirectX 11 systems, and Cloud Gate for DirectX 10 PCs. Another reason is that it is also set to make an appearance on Windows RT, iOS and Android in the coming months.

Should make comparing the theoretical performance of various Windows RT tablets fun when it does!

Please Leave Your Comments Below...

  • Andrew

    Developers dont really seem to be in a hurry to make games happen on this platform

    • Fahad Ali

      I think a lot of it has got to do with the RT and its ARM architecture. It comes with a particularly hard learning curve, so much so, that even big developers are taking their time to release apps that support Windows RT.

      Do agree, quality gaming on this platform is still a few leagues away!