Apple Does Indeed Take Its 30% Cut From Every Microsoft Office Subscription

The usual 30 percent, eh? The ratio by which app revenue is split between developers and distributors seems to be set in store, not only for small one-person creators, but large enterprises too.

Anyone and everyone that sells software through iTunes has to abide by these rules. Even Microsoft.

Office for iPad launched yesterday, and now an Apple representative has confirmed that the company is taking its 30 percent cut from every Office 365 subscription that is purchased by iPad owners that want to unlock the editing features in Word, Excel and PowerPoint.

Apple welcomed the arrival, though it also took the opportunity to mention its own productivity solution alongside, which it offers for free:

“We’re excited that Office is coming to iPad — now part of the more than 500,000 apps designed specifically for iPad. iPad has defined a new category of mobile computing and productivity and transformed the way the world works.

Office for iPad joins an incredible lineup of productivity apps like iWork, Evernote and Paper by FiftyThree that users can choose from to inspire them to do more with this powerful device.”

Excited, and then talk, talk, talk about iPad and other apps!

But we’ll take it. Office for iPad has been a long time coming. Besides, this is heartwarming news when you consider that Apple and Microsoft could not reach an agreement when Microsoft was offering in-app purchases in one of its apps a little while ago.

Back then it was SkyDrive.

Back then it was Steve Ballmer running the show.

Please Leave Your Comments Below...

  • Wayne S

    You could look at it this way, or you could say Microsoft takes 70% of the cut. haha 🙂

  • Emily W

    Hmm. A little disappointing for Microsoft I have to think. Office is, without a doubt, the best app on the app store now in my view and I think they should be taking at least 80% in. Just the way it looks to me.

  • Ray C

    Hopefully they get people all hooked on Office again, then down the line make sure the best experience is of course on a Windows device.

  • Jason Claven

    I have to agree with Emily. It’s good for Microsoft’s business, but I think Apple makes out even better here. They get the best possible program to add to the store and still get 30%. I think Microsoft should’ve held out until they received at least 75%.