Almost everything about the Nokia Lumia 1020 is majestic. To the camera and video recording quality, to the solid build and design of the smartphone, everything is grandiose.

And so is the price that the device launched in markets around the globe.

AT&T stared offering the impressive Windows Phone 8 smartphone with the 41 megapixel camera for $299.99 with a new two year contract upon launch. But amid reports of supposedly lukewarm sales, the wireless carrier reduced the price to $199.99 in select US markets in mid-August.

Now, it has made the price cut permanent.

Both AT&T and Microsoft have been hyping up the imaging capabilities of the Lumia 1020 in their own TV commercials. The result is that the device now constantly ranks among the top selling smartphone on various places β€” it is now said to be a top 3 selling smartphone at AT&T.

But the wireless network, obviously, believes that the lower price will help drive sales across the country even further. Either way, it is great news for fans and people looking to buy the smartphone.

Speaking of which, the cost to buy the Nokia Lumia 1020 outright has also been reduced.

Previously available for $659, AT&T is now listing the no contract price of the smartphone at $609, making it $50 less than the previous cost β€” not much, but hey, it’s a start.

These price cuts could not have come at a better time, it must be said. Nokia is reportedly gearing up to launch its first ever full HD, quad-core, 6-inch phablet later this month. The Lumia 1520 is expected to feature a 20 megapixel camera, a factor that AT&T must surely have considered.

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  • Ray C

    I wouldn’t mind having a 1020, but even at a cut of $300, there is no way I could buy a phone at that non-contract rate.