Bing Starts Accepting Right To Be Forgotten Requests

Starting today, Microsoft is taking in the ‘Right to Be Forgotten’ requests from Europe, and users that want their names removed from search results in Bing can do so with the help of an online form.

The new form requires users to provide details like identity, residence and contact information, along with role in society or community, plus the pages that a user wants blocked.

A file upload option is also available for users in the Old Continent to upload documents that verify their full legal name and country of residence — these will be used to confirm the identity, and settle whether the person requesting for the deletion of information is indeed authentic.

Sure, this could potentially raise additional concerns for privacy, but there you go:

“We encourage you to provide complete and relevant information for each applicable question on this form. We will use the information that you provide to evaluate your request. We may also consider other sources of information beyond this form to verify or supplement the information you provide.”

Interestingly, making a request here does not guarantee that a particular search result will be blocked. The demand will be weighed against individual privacy interest and the public interest.

Google was one of the first companies to launch such a form, and said that the amount of requests it received in the first month were overwhelming — according to statistics revealed earlier this month, more than 70,000 takedown requests have been received since May.

Microsoft is very likely to share its figure in the coming weeks and months.

Please Leave Your Comments Below...

  • Steve Fulton

    Good. Bing continues to plug along and quietly be better than Google in a lot of ways. It wouldn’t shock me if Bing overtakes Google as the top search engine at some point in the future. I think it can really be that good.

  • Ray C

    Good move. I’m sure I’ll forget to choose it though