Gartner Urges Users To Prepare For The Death Of Windows XP

The classic Windows XP is soon destined for retirement, as Microsoft confirmed earlier this month that it was sticking to its April 8, 2014 deadline for providing support for the old OS.

While Microsoft’s message is (and has been) loud and clear, not everyone seems to be listening.

Analysts expect that while most will migrate to a newer platform, but approximately 15 percent of large and midsize enterprises will still run Windows XP beyond this date. These new numbers are speculated by Gartner, whereby the research firm warns users of the consequences:

“New vulnerabilities are always being found, and new vulnerabilities that are found in more current products could affect Windows XP and Office 2003. Any unpatched device can be vulnerable to attack.”

Gartner’s statements pretty much reflect what Microsoft recently said — that is computers and networks could be left vulnerable to attacks.

The research firm also provides recommendations and urges users (particularly companies) to start the migration process from Windows XP. In the statement Gartner emphasizes that organizations must conduct a series of analysis to confirm which applications can be used on newer versions of Windows:

“Most organizations have far too many applications. Organizations where users are administrators typically have one application for every 10 users, with about half of these requiring Windows to run.

For critical applications that can run on Windows 7, consider moving these users first. If Windows 7 can’t be used, prioritize these applications and users so that you can move them as soon as possible.”

At this point in time Windows XP remains the second most popular operating system in the world, behind Windows 7. The soon to be 12-year-old OS commands a market share of 38.73 percent, according to latest statistics.

But the good news is that it is steadily (if slowly) dropping.