Hardware Industry Sees Delay Of Intel Broadwell CPUs As A Good Thing

Hardware Industry Sees Delay Of Intel Broadwell CPUs As A Good Thing

It is not often that a delay is seen as a good thing, but the hardware industry actually sees the delay in launch of Intel’s 14nm Broadwell line of processors as a good sign.

These are the fifth generation Core series CPUs, by the way, the successor to the Haswell lineup that was released a few months back. Intel announced that due to a pesky little glitch (now fixed) they had to move the production of the processor to early 2014.

Sure, it delays the company’s push to bring 14nm processors to the mobile market on time as scheduled earlier, but PC makers (particularly notebook manufactures) seem rather relieved.

It would have been something seeing two Intel processor families launching within the same year, but the fallout for hardware makers is apparently minimum — most are said to be pleased with the delay as they will be able to properly transition from Ivy Bridge to Haswell.

Plus, they will not have to initiate price cuts early, and instead will have around three extra months to clear out inventories.

Intel has started to be rather aggressive in development of new technologies and microarchitectures, keeping in mind the mobile wars and how it has been losing out to ARM based processor designers. The chip giant has made clear its plans to assert its leadership on both Android and Windows fronts.

With Windows 8.1 launch currently ongoing, numerous hardware makers have started bringing their Intel Atom based touch capable devices to market, particularly in the 8-inch display segment.

Not to mention several new Haswell based notebooks and ultrabooks that ready to be released.