Intel: PC Form Factors Are Beginning To Blur

Intel: PC Form Factors Are Beginning To Blur

While tablets have been around for quite some time now, these devices really found mainstream success after the release of Apple’s iPad. Nevertheless, market analysts have usually been found confused when it comes to classifying these new devices.

Some put these into the same category as smartphones, other categorize tablets as a new form of PC. As a matter of pure fact, most financial reports put these tablets in a special category of their own when displaying sales numbers.

Intel, however, believes that the form-factors of personal computers are blurring.

The outgoing chief executive officer of the world’s largest chipmaker thinks that tablets and slates have started to gain feature sets and performance that is comparable to desktops and notebooks. Paul Otellini was quoted as saying:

“The PC business, as we have known it and as it is evolving and I would include tablets in that because as we look forward, it is very difficult to distinguish between a detachable, clamshell notebook and a tablet.

The form-factors are going to blur here. The performance requirements are going to be the same spectrum of performance requirements that we think we have seen in the PC space over the last two years.”

In other words, the term “PC” will soon stop meaning traditional desktop and notebooks, but will include devices like tablets and even phablets.

One major reason for this paradigm shift is the availability of inexpensive (yet powerful) components for use in mobile devices, making way for powerful smartphones.

Another is, obviously, the emergence of Windows 8 on tablets and slates. While Microsoft, for years on, reserved positioned Windows as a PC operating system, the powers that be at Redmond finally brought their flagship OS to mobile devices, signaling a brand new shift.

Traditional desktops and laptops will always have their place, particularly among people creating content (that is then consumed on media tablets), but there is enough evidence to suggest that the very idea of PC is about to shift.

Do share your take on this. Do you see yourself using a PC at all ten years down the road? Or using it only occasionally for work and play, and transferring your primary computing to mobile devices.