Microsoft Employees Seemingly Unsettled By Recent Events

One of the most important technology companies of the world is currently going through a crucial restructuring process, while looking for a new CEO and at the same time completing the Nokia takeover.

Things could not get more interesting for Redmond, even if it tried.

But with so many changes that are underway at the company, employees are worried. Insider sources, talking to Reuters, have revealed the reservations of Microsoft personnel regarding the company’s future in general, and their jobs in particular.

Some of them are unsettled because of Ballmer’s retirement, while others believe that the company is not heading in the right direction. An employee was quoted as saying:

“Like Wall Street, there was initial euphoria with the announcement for employees. But he is as much a symptom as the actual problem. This whole crazy re-org will still happen. And nothing will really change.

Among many of my fellow employees – both new hires and long-timers – there is a recognition that Microsoft has lost its way.”

Ballmer, as you may recall has made it clear that no one would be fired as part of the technology giant’s transition towards a devices and services concept. But workers are, nevertheless, concerned that some might get fired.

And this is something that could become a reality when you take into account that Microsoft will start the integration of Nokia’s mobile unit in the very near future. Another employee chimed in:

“The re-org is more unsettling for some people than Ballmer’s departure. Exactly how that shakes out is more interesting.

There is always a small percentage of people who do lose their job, or get put into an awkward new role. For those people, morale is very bad, of course. But whoever you talk to, they all noticed that the stock went up on the Ballmer (retirement) news. If sustained, that will make morale improve broadly.”

As you can clearly gather, morale of the troops seems to be somewhat down.

Steve Ballmer will retire within the next 12 months, or as soon as a successor is found. Microsoft is currently considering both internal and external candidates, but Stephen Elop, the former Nokia CEO who has joined Microsoft as part of the takeover, seems to be leading the race.