Microsoft Revises The App Rating Algorithm On The Windows Phone Store

Ratings. It often comes down to these little numbers, and this is particularly true on apps repository. With countless apps to wade through, it is imperative that users get access to relevant applications as easily as possible.

And it seems Microsoft has done just that with an update to its rating algorithm on the Windows Phone Store. In fact, the software titan has implemented a completely new algorithm.

As this report notes, the company has rolled out this new system on its portal so that users are no longer spammed with application that they are not interested in when they are viewing categories like top games and top apps.

Spam (or low quality) applications sure do ruin the experience on the Windows Store and the Windows Phone Store, and Microsoft has been doing all it can to weed them out.

And now the company will take into consideration a series of factors to encourage quality. The new algorithm will rate software by performance levels that will be based on customer satisfaction ratings that it receives.

Not just that — this new system will also take into account the frequency at which an application is pinned or unpinned from the Start Screen, even the number of crashes that the users experience.

Quality control at its absolute finest? You bet!

Previously the rating and ranking system was rather simple, and was based primarily on the number of downloads that a particular application had raked up. But this new algorithm is now rolling out on all sections of the Windows Phone Store portal.

Please Leave Your Comments Below...

  • Jake

    Great move. Microsoft recognizes this is the first step in making their app store as powerful and popular as droid’s app store and apple’s app store are.

  • Sally Black

    Very important and cannot be stressed enough. Ratings play a huge role on whether or not people (including me) will download an app. Before, I had noticed it was an issue, but now it’ll be much easier to recognize what apps are truly the “best.”

  • Ted Smith

    I’m extremely curious in algorithm’s like this one. I’d love to see the actual algorithm used and how they cam to the decision on what data to use and with what weight they should give it. Good news either way.