Security experts agree that Redmond’s latest operating system is the most secure version of Windows yet, as it comes with several new technologies and enhancements to protect users, both online and off.

In fact, most are of the view that Windows 8 will be harder to hack, as its core security is not just amped up to new levels, but Microsoft very actively fixes exploits, flaws and vulnerabilities as they are found — to the disappointment of hackers and cybercriminals, I am sure.

Chris Hallum, a senior product manager on the Windows team detailed in a blog post how much emphasis the software titan put on security as it sat down to design Windows 8.

The new operating system was developed with security in mind right from the very beginning:

“Our goals were to provide ground breaking malware resistance, make data encryption easy enough that everyone can deploy it, and finally we wanted to modernize access control. We understand that these goals can’t be achieved in software alone and that we needed to anchor our security in immutable hardware.”

Hallum also describes the three hardware technologies Microsoft implemented — Universal Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI), the Trusted Platform Module (TPM) 2.0 and the Encrypted Hard Drives — that Microsoft has employed to protect user data and keep it secure:

“Early on in the Windows 8 product cycle we worked closely with our partners in the hardware industry to make sure that the hardware necessary to achieve our goals would be available as options or even as fundamental requirements for Windows 8 Hardware certification.”

These enhancements probably sound highly technical for most people, but their implementations go a long way in keeping cybercriminals and their prying eyes away from Microsoft’s newest OS.

If anything recent reports suggest that most hackers have turned their attention to greener pastures and (comparatively) less secure operating systems like Google’s Android.

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  • WillyThePooh

    The biggest threat to an OS is not the software or hardware but the users. As long as dump users are around, none of the OS is safe. People think one OS is safer than the other is just an illusion. If an OS is worth the effort to hack, it will be hacked.