The technology titan proved a lot of rumors right yesterday, after confirming that Windows Blue was just a codename for the upcoming upgrade, and it would hit the market as Windows 8.1.

Microsoft also revealed that a public preview version is set for arrival on June 26.

The CFO of the Windows division Tami Reller mentioned all these details at the JP Morgan Technology, Media and Telecom Conference. But another important fact that the senior executive declared was that Windows 8.1 is not to be considered a service pack — it is a complete update for Windows 8.

Technology enthusiasts would have no problem making a difference between the two, but what this means is that the software titan is quite ready to put an end to the service pack concept.

This concept was popularized with Windows XP, and the classic operating system was the first to get these service packs. Windows version 3, on the other hand, actually received major version upgrades, the most popular of which was Windows 3.1.

It goes without saying that Windows 8.1 seems to be cut from the same cloth.

What this means for Windows 7 users is that they could indeed be left without a second service pack. Not many are expecting Microsoft to release one, but some were still hoping Microsoft would change its mind and release something

Nevertheless, we have official confirmation that Windows 8.1 is a substantially bigger upgrade than a traditional update, even bigger than what one would expect from a service pack. What this new strategy means is that Microsoft may also be open to releasing Windows 8.2 sometimes next year.

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  • http://www.facebook.com/echombeau Ed Chombeau

    W8 is not satisfactory to the non-touch/mouse/desktop folks. That’s the essence of my complaints. I do not have touch experience with it so cannot comment on Tile Start page. I want the Desktop portion to keep it’s speed and put back the start screen. I tried to put my own “apps” on the Tiles; however,some of the important ones only work on the “old” desktop screen. I’m sure that’s one reason they went with the two versions (desktop and Tile)Microsoft has heard this; they better do some serious stuff to 8.1 to get us nontouch folks to want to buy W8 in the first place. I got mine cheap last January to try it; it’s just more trouble than it’s worth even if free!

    • Agosto Nuñez

      I have Windows 8 without a touch device, and I love it, scrolling with the mouse and keyboard is easy, all the applications I’ve downloaded (LOTS) work seamlessly fine with my good-old mouse & keyboard, and I never had a single moment in the ”metro” interface when I thought ”Hmmm, I’d love a touch device”. I would honestly have more trouble with my fingers on the metro screen than using mouse-clicks to get menu’s and the charms bar. It’s just really easy to work with.

  • Darrin Tyler

    How do they define a “update” What kind of update exactly?

    • Agosto Nuñez

      back in my days, we would’ve called it an ”upgrade”, back in the older-windows days it would’ve been called ”a service pack”, definitions are whatever the user makes of it, it’s English, the language of confusion.