Microsoft Windows Phone 8 and Windows 8 Need to Up Their Game in the Enterprise World

Microsoft has a solid product with Windows 8 and Windows Phone 8, particularly for enterprise users. Why is it then that folks like myself can regularly point out the virtues of enterprise use for Windows and yet Microsoft can be bothered to do the same?

I feel like Microsoft has great engineers and knows what it is doing when developing an OS (regardless of whether you love Windows and the new modern UI or not) – but the marketing staff seriously isn’t all that great.

It is numerous little things that drive me nuts about Microsoft’s advertising efforts. From the odd-ball original references to the Surface RT as the “Microsoft Surface tablet with Windows RT” to the anti-Google campaigns that seem to backfire more than actually help.

Microsoft has handled so many things wrong on a marketing and advertising level, including getting out enough devices and tackling customer perception of Windows 8’s new UI. The real issue I want to focus on though is the enterprise.

Samsung is really moving forward on BYOD and other enterprise-focused strategies and advertising. Sammy has its own commercials point out what’s great about their Android devices. Microsoft needs to follow suite with something of its own.

To be fair, yes I have heard that they are working with Samsung, Nokia and others on enterprise efforts. I don’t want talk though, I want action.

What would commercials focus on?

Let’s say Microsoft decided to dedicate a series of commercials to the enterprise. Now what? What would be the focus points:

Windows 8 Focus Points

1) The ability to work seamlessly with legacy apps and new touch-optimized apps
2) Windows 8 works easily with your existing Windows-based Servers and network, no need to add special tools just to add tablets into your business infrastructure
3) The iPad and Android tablets are seriously lacking when it comes to multi-user and other advanced business security features – with Windows 8 tablets you get all the enterprise level software compatibility you get with desktops and laptops running Windows.
4) Familiarity. While Microsoft’s new Modern UI requires some training, at the core, Windows is Windows. You won’t need to worry about teaching system admins or even daily users how to do familiar tasks like running control panel options and more.
5) Flexibility of design. From Windows 8-based tablets to ultrabooks to touch, even hybrids and convertibles. There is a Windows 8 device that fits perfectly into your business, or even works great for those times when you just want to play as well.

Windows Phone 8 Focus Points

1) Advanced encryption support. Windows Phone 8 is very secure, probably one of the most business friendly mobile operating systems on the market.
2) Exchange email support. From Outlook.com to Exchange, Windows Phone 8 works well with many major email clients.
3) Lync integration.
4) Office integration. Despite alternatives, businesses still love and often rely on Office, with Windows Phone 8 you get some of the best Office support and integration possible on a mobile device.

That’s just a small highlight on some of the many great features that both Windows Phone 8 and Windows 8 have to offer for enterprise users. The bottom-line is that Microsoft needs to start selling these products, because no matter how great they are, without the proper marketing they clearly won’t sell themselves.

I actually like the direction Microsoft is attempting with its Windows mobile and desktop efforts, I just think they could do a better job of truly reaching customers at this point. What about you?
Do you agree that Microsoft hasn’t done a very good job with marketing, or do you think I’m being a bit unfair on Redmond here? Additionally, what do you think of Microsoft’s Windows Phone 8 and Windows 8’s potential in the enterprise world?

Please Leave Your Comments Below...

  • ECM2

    Until now Windows 8 Phone does not have a Citrix Receiver app. Why?

  • Welcome 2

    Monkey see monkey do- a lack of originality defines windows since Ballmer.