New Statistics Show Windows Phone Has Overtaken BlackBerry In Usage Share

The start of a new month, and that means statistics galore as the industry scrambles to find the movers and shakers in the past 30 or so days that followed.

And when it comes to movers, you will have to look really hard to find one better than Windows Phone.

Latest numbers from Net Applications show that Microsoft’s mobile platform has finally overtaken BlackBerry when it comes to usage share. Even with the release of its BlackBerry 10 operating system (and the Z10 smartphone), the fruity communication giant had to give way to Redmond.

Another fruity company (Apple) still leads the roost with a 61.41 percent total market share.

Android has to make do with 24.85 percent, while Java ME and Symbian registered numbers in the 8.16 and 1.71 percent range respectively.

Windows Phone finally is good enough to sit at fifth place in the list overall with a 1.50 percent showing. Still a long, long way to go, but in this particular case the only way to go is up.

Even though BlackBerry reportedly shipped 1 million units of its Z10 smartphone in the first quarter of availability, it still has to endure a 0.01 percent decline in usage share — it now holds just 1.38 percent of the market.

Last month’s figures put Windows Phone at 1.24 percent share, while BlackBerry at 1.39 percent. So all things considered, this is one impressive showing from Microsoft’s mobile platform.

Worth mentioning is that fact these numbers only take into account statistics from the United States, and not worldwide, where Google actually commands the most number of users.

Ultimately, though while Microsoft will be joyed and buoyed by the results, one company that will be sorely disappointed with how things are shaping up is BlackBerry. Not only is it itself losing a hold of the market, but considering how Microsoft’s mobile platform is gathering it, things could only get tougher.

BlackBerry’s major hope was in the enterprise sector and office environment. But this is exactly where Microsoft looks set to strike — and strike hard.