Nokia By Microsoft Actually Has Quite A Ring To It

In case you are yet to notice, Microsoft is in the process of charting its new mobile strategy after completing the acquisition of Nokia’s devices and services unit.

And a big part of this is branding — in other words, what the company will label future handsets. Microsoft Mobile looks good on paper (and maybe even the back of devices), but it is after all the name of a company division, not exactly suitable to be turned into a brand.

However, there is one name that might do the trick. Globally, at that.

There is talk that the next smartphones launched by Redmond could be branded as “Nokia by Microsoft”. All this while Redmond has been actively removing the Nokia name from its apps on the Windows and Windows Phone stores.

The Lumia brand is gone, and instead will be used for the tablet lineup. The reason behind this move is simply obvious. Lumia is a more popular brand than Surface, despite Microsoft’s best efforts, and it just might provide that extra dynamism to the tablets if they are branded as Lumia slates.

And although Nokia by Microsoft might not sound bad, there is one little snag here.

Tagging all future Windows Phone models as Nokia by Microsoft is a problem onto itself, particularly when the Lumia branding is removed. No wonder, the company is taking its time with this.

It is perhaps a fair assessment that Microsoft has a bit of a history with badly named brands — names that were revised or corrected later down the road. The Windows Azure to Microsoft Azure renaming being the latest such memory.

Going in with the right ones for the tablet and smartphone markets is crucial now for future success.

Please Leave Your Comments Below...

  • Mary

    I think this is the move. You need to ensure the Nokia name you paid so much for is known to consumers. Nokia still evokes a positive response from most of the public, so I think Nokia by Microsoft is the way to go.

  • Ray C

    I really didn’t like the change from Surface to Lumia, but I guess one the ARM versions it makes sense. You can’t have both. Either way the still need to make sure they have offerings in low-end, mid-range, and high-end markets