We Are Going To Take The Fight To Google And Apple, Says Nadella

The new Microsoft CEO is slowly coming into his own. After bringing forward a completely new vision for the company in an open letter this week, Satya Nadella has fired off a war cry against competitors.

In a new interview he explained that he has already found a way to challenge the absolute domination from both Google and Apple, which is another way of saying that Steve Ballmer’s strategy of pushing Redmond towards a devices and services concept is no longer relevant.

This follows the email to Microsoft employees that Nadella sent yesterday, which is a long but interesting read, well worth the time.

And now talking to The Verge, Nadella said that the technology giant will deploy a few short term methods to increase its market share in the United States significantly.

But at the same time, consumers are not just consumers for Microsoft, and the company is trying to become part of their lives, in helping them find success with their daily activities:

“I fundamentally believe that it’s most important to us to convince consumers. You’re defining the market as ‘It’s already done, Apple and Google have won, because they won the consumer side.’ And I’m going to question that.

I’m going to say ‘No, any thinking consumer should consider Microsoft because guess what, you’re not just a consumer. You’re also going to go to work, you’re also going to be productive and we can do a better job for you in there.’ And that’s what I want to appeal to.”

The entire piece is a very good read, so hit up the link above for more insights from the Microsoft CEO.

At the same time, we await the series of changes that Satya Nadella has promised in the coming weeks, when the company conducts a couple of high profile events. Microsoft’s quarterly financial result are also expected later this month.

Please Leave Your Comments Below...

  • Randy A

    Just what the doctor ordered. Microsoft is still ahead of Apple and Google in a lot of ways, but definitely need to catch them in other ways. Nadella seems like the man to do it, but now he needs to put his money where his mouth is.

  • Ray C

    I’m sorry but I find all these articles related to Nadella to be misleading. There is nothing in anything that Nadella has said that says “I’m moving away from Ballmer” except the people who want to spin it that way. What does taking the fight to your competitors have to do with Ballmer vs Nadella? X-Box, Bing, Office 365, Azure, new Nokia Phones; tell me what these things fall under…………..ding ding Devices and Services.

    • Black Eagle

      Good point. Why would Microsoft go through huge changes, just to do it again a year later. These companies think long term. What Ballmer starting doing his last year or two was getting it ready for the future and Nadella. Choosing different key statements to enlighten consumers is one things. They are a devices and services company. They are also a cloud company. Seems as though Nadella is combing and adding in the importance of other services or software or whatever and not removing them.

    • JohnnyB

      Have to agree Ray. Nadella and Ballmer isn’t important at this point. It’s easy to start some kind of comparison between the last two CEOs, but I don’t see any contention or hard feelings. The company is evolving in some ways, but staying true to its bread and butter in others. That’s business.

    • Fahad Ali

      “More recently, we have described ourselves
      as a “devices and services” company. While the devices and services
      description was helpful in starting our transformation, we now need to
      hone in on our unique strategy.”

      Well you can’t expect a CEO to be more candid than this. 🙂 Maybe it is building upon the concept that Ballmer initiated (which isn’t exactly revolutionary in the first place), or maybe it is moving away from it in some capacities, but the company seems to be wanting to go deeper than just what the competition is offering. We should find out more soon.

      It probably could be a blend of both Apple and Google, keeping in mind the hardware and software ecosystem that Microsoft has built these last two decades. It certainly is in a unique capacity to pull it off, that’s for sure.

  • Coatsey

    I hope and believe they can come back subject to accepting that 80 of the time I’m in tablet, no physical keyboard mode and then the other 20% of the time I want a keyboard perhaps, physical that is. So office needs to be far better touch centric and even the Suface 3 is too heavy but so getting close. I don’t think they should give up on RT either, if you could get full office touch centric on RT in a Surface 3 package, only thinner with better battery which it would, I’d stop my relentless migration to OSX, iOS and their Pages, Keynote and Numbers Application. Lastly they must sort out the purchase experience and inconsistent support and service all round. Enough said I feel.