Will Windows 8 Destroy the Consumer Antivirus Market

At Microsoft’s BUILD conference last week, Microsoft showed off a lot about Windows 8’s new security features, one being the all-new Windows Defender. As you may already know, Windows Defender has been used just to remove spyware. Nothing else.

Windows Security Essentials was for removing any kind of malware. Now Windows Defender has all the features of Security Essentials built in. Because of this, some analysts are starting to say that the need for any desktop security software is gone. PCMag’s Michael Muchmore stated that “[The new Windows Defender] obviates the need for an AV program.”

PCMag’s Neil Rubenking talked to people from a number of major security companies about how they felt about the new security enhancements to Windows 8.

According to Gary Davis, director of consumer product marketing at McAfee, McAfee is actually working closely with Microsoft on some of the security features in Windows 8. Davis thinks that there will always be a need for computer security and “that the world is inher

ently more secure with a robust choice of security vendors and technology options.”

A few other companies are thinking like McAfee and saying that somewhere in the world there will always be a need for 3rd party security. Mikko Hypponen the CRO of F-Secure Corporation says, “By the time Windows 8 has a significant market share, it might very well be that we see the need for antivirus on other platforms like Android than Windows…”

Beth Jordan, vice president of NorthAmerican Communications for AVG, says that “Consumers have always shown a strong affinity for third party software when it comes to security…When it comes to security consumers want choices and brands they can use with confidence and trust.”

Some companies think that Microsoft hasn’t gone far enough in its security and only standalone, 3rd party programs can offer full protection. John Gable, head of consumer products for Check Point Technologies says, “Any improvement is a step in the right direction…one critical area Windows is still lacking…is a powerful and easy-to-use two-way firewall.”

And then there are some security companies don’t even think that Microsoft has done anything to improve Windows’ security. Mike Plante, Symantec’s vice president of product marketing, said, “The next version of Windows Defender is just a repackaging of Microsoft Security Essentials.”

Personally, I think that just to be sure, you should always have some form of desktop security software, but this is great for all the people who just don’t bother to install security software because it’s “expensive” or “hard to use.” If good security software is built right into the OS, then the people that aren’t normally protected from online threats, will be.

What do you think? Is the new Windows Defender good enough to replace a full fledged desktop security program? Or do you still need that extra layer of protection?

  • Owais_503

    i think yes, the new Windows Defender good enough to replace a full fledged desktop security program.

  • 1234568

    Microsoft may be improving security but it wont be fail safe. If anti-virus companies can prove that they are capable of detecting viruses that Windows Defender misses, or provide solutions quicker than Microsoft can, then they still have value. Only time will tell.

  • zulbia_bamie

    windows 7 have already  done it for me. I just use MSE and I have no problem BTW unlike the others MSE doesn’t slow down my pc.

  • sizxb

    NEW Windows Defender will not going to be able to completely replace other AV’s in the market as everybody already knows that how much capable is MSE and how much capable is their rival products.
    New windows defender will sure be useful and sufficient for new and basic user but i am damn sure that the advanced or moderate user needs more features and security.It is not possible to ruin the Reputation of some companies like Kaspersky ,Bitdefender and Of course Avast.

    But we will have to wait and see.

  • Philip John

    The built-in theory is good for now, but “hackers” would find this as an interesting challenge.
    One would, quite literally leave an open door to the codes and algorithms, because it’s part of the system root.

    Phrase of rule for hackers/programers “If it’s their in full, it’s hackable”.
    They, for the most, love PHP injections and other Unix scripting.

    Dogmatic mind set on this issue is voluntary embeddment for the egotistical or burned outs.