Windows 10 Creators Update Market Share Crosses 72%

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Advertising firm AdDuplex is here with their monthly round of statistics across the Windows 10 ecosystem. Creators Update, once again, is the major talking point this time around.

According to the company, the latest version of the operating system is now powering some 72.5% of the PCs that were registered in a snapshot from the data collected from over 5,000 Windows Store apps that were utilizing its SDK.

Across a 24-hour period beginning September 20, 2017.

Anyway, what we have now is a substantial increase from the 65.6% reported last month for the Creators Update. On the onset this may seem impressive, but the company notes that this is still quite a slow performance by the latest version of the OS.

AdDuplex September 2017

And with the Fall Creators Update just around the corner, Microsoft would do well to speed things up here a couple notches — the Windows 10 Anniversary Update was sitting comfortably at 91.2% one month prior to the release of the Creators Update earlier this year.

AdDuplex September 2017

Amazingly, AdDuplex also managed to map out the distribution of the Creators Update by region. The map shows that while the Creators Update is doing well in most western and some African countries, it is finding it hard to push through in many other areas.

Asia, in particular.

AdDuplex September 2017

As for the top PC manufacturers, the list of top 10 remained the same as the previous report. HP led the pack with 25.2%, while Dell and Lenovo followed suit with 16.1% and 12.4% respectively.

Although the Surface Pro 4 still accounted for 41.2% of Surface devices, here in these statistics, but the tablet decreased its global market share. The figure is even lower in the US, at 35.1%. The 2017 model of the Surface Pro, however, has grown to 5.8% worldwide, up from 3.7% last month.

AdDuplex September 2017

Amazingly, Surface Studio, rose from its statistical insignificance of 0.0% last time, and is now hovering at 0.1%, which is fair enough for a device that costs $2,999.

All said and done, not a bad month for Microsoft.

Agreed?

Please Leave Your Comments Below...

  • Thinkaboutit

    The only “amazing” thing is that almost 30 percent of WIN 10’s “Windows as a Service” customers have taken the time to learn how to stop and/or control Microsoft’s automatic, forced updates/upgrades. Obliviously, this has to be by far mostly business and enterprise customers who can’t afford the lost time and costs of dealing with WaaS problems every month. Not many “home” users have a clue how to relieve the suffering caused by these automatic and forced monthly updates and twice-yearly upgrades.

    BTW, your headline is misleading.

    • 12Danny123

      It’s clear you don’t know what you’re talking about

      • Thinkaboutit

        Actually, it’s clear YOU don’t know what I’m talking about. Look up the usage stats for ALL versions of Windows in use. That should give you a clue.