Windows Phone On Track To Double Its Market Share By 2018

Forecasts. There may be such a thing as predicting too deep into the future. But the smartphone world is not all that susceptible to these follies, what with both the iOS and Android platform having matured.

That leaves only Windows Phone with a lot to gain.

And a lot it is expected to gain, according to a recent mobile phone forecast published by International Data Corporation. IDC does not predict any major changes (or upsets) in the next 3 to 4 years, and both leading platforms will not suffer any major variations.

idc_mobile_forecast_2018_a

But Microsoft’s very own mobile operating system is poised to post significant growth in the next couple of years, effectively doubling its market share by 2018 if all goes according to plan.

Provided Windows Phone keeps up the momentum, it is expected to grow 29.5% this year, compared to 2013. Total shipments? Some 43.3 million units.

Luckily, this is only the beginning.

Next year sales of Windows Phone handsets could reach 65.9 million handsets, and by 2018 this figure could well rise to 115.3 million smartphones. Still, that might only be enough for a 6.4% market share overall, which is still better than the 3.5% the platform currently has to its name.

The big loser here?

Why, Android, of course. Google’s platform, IDC forecasts, will drop from the highs of 80.2% this year to 77.6% in 2018. Which in the grand scheme of thing, means nothing.

Not when you have over 1.8 billion devices shipping each year. Crazy.

Please Leave Your Comments Below...

  • Ray C

    I think they’ll catch iOs at some point. The only thing that stops is now is the biggest smart phone market, the U.S., still has Apple on the brain

    • Dominico-James Black Eagle Hod

      True. With Windows Phone and Windows now free (below 9 inches) I think Windows Phones market share will grow even quicker

  • Jake

    Interesting. We’ll see if these projections hold true, but the fact is Windows Phone is only going to get bigger from here on out.

  • Bart

    Most smartphones are still over $500 with most over $600 even a few over $700 for all varieties. It might shave a small amount but it won’t drastically change the overall prices. Contract prices vary but don’t stay consistent with the non-contract prices.